19e-Halloween in Bay Ridge 2015

In posting 19d-Growing Up Italian American: Halloween through the generations I wrote about the annual Halloween art contest students at schools in Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights participate in.  Students from grades K through 12 prepare their pictures in school and are then selected to reproduce their art work on the windows of shops in Bay Ridge that participate in the contest.  During an early morning walk, I passed by two colorful paintings.  This offered me the opportunity to use the camera in my new Android phone.  I’m delighted with the results.  Even more I’m very happy to see so many talented young children and teens participating in this yearly event.

For our local news coverage and photos of the 2015 entrants to the 63rd Annual Halloween Poster and Storefront Window Painting Contest, please check out the article at the Brooklyn Eagle’s online edition for October 27, 2015.

These photos were taken on Third Avenue in the 70s.  The paintings stay in the windows for a few weeks so I’m hoping to see more when I’m out and about running errands.

Advertisements

19d-Growing up Italian-American: Halloween through the generations

Illustration from “Tippety Witchit’s Halloween” originally appearing in “My Book House” ed. by Olive Beaupre Miller.

Introduction

Uncle Sammy, Antoinette Serrapere and I share our experiences of celebrating Halloween as we grew-up in the Italian-American communities of our home towns.  This holiday is of Celtic origin and was not celebrated by our ancestors in Italy.  However, as the descendants of Italian immigrants grew-up in America they participated in the Halloween festivities through school and community sponsored activities.  The preparation of this posting offered us an opportunity to see how the participation has changed with each generation.

For children, Halloween is a point during the year when anything and everything can happen.  Ghosts might walk through the house.  The departed might appear in their dreams.  A generous neighbor might put $1 in each goodie bag.  The big kid who loves to scare the younger children might be waiting around the corner ready to shout “Boo!”  We shared expectations similar to these.

The celebration of Halloween has not remained fixed throughout the decades since our ancestors came to the United States.  By recording our memories of this holiday we found that it continues to grow and change.  The ways in which it does reflect the times we live in.  As an example, it was more common for children to go from house-to-house with their friends in the 1960s.  Today many children are accompanied by their parents to go trick-or-treating at planned get-togethers with neighbors or friends.  This development has arisen out of concerns for child safety.

Relationship Notes

Josie and Sabato Serrapede were the parents of Sammy (Sabbatino) and Emily Leatrice Serrapede.

EmilyAnn Frances May is their granddaughter through Emily Leatrice.  Sammy is her maternal Uncle.

Antoinette Serrapere is a member of the Serrapede family from Agropoli.  She is the daughter of Nicholas and Rosemary (nee Calhoun) Serrapere.  Her Grandparents Cosimo and Anna Marie (nee Botti) Serrapere immigrated to the U.S. from Italy in the early 20th century.  Antoinette’s family lived in Wilmerding as she grew up.

Serrapere is a variation of the surname Serrapede.

Dyker Heights:  1930s

  • My Mom, Emily L. Serrapede, never spoke at great length about Halloween.  She did mention that when she was growing up the emphasis amongst the first generation of Italian immigrants was on All Saints Day (November 1st) and All Souls Day (November 2nd).  She remembered that November 2nd was a day when many people went to church to light a candle for their departed relatives and friends.
  • The three holidays were not observed in the Serrapede household when Mom grew up.  The family visited the cemeteries and took care of the graves of their departed relatives as time and weather permitted.  Prayers or devotions were offered up for the departed on the anniversary of the person’s passing.

Continue reading

19c-Coppola Family: Our Paesanos and Cousins in Agropoli and America

Acknowledgement

Imagines Maiorum is a website dedicated to Anthony Vermandois’ genealogical research of families who lived in Agropoli, Atripalda, Castellabate, Laureana Cilento, Monte san Giacomo, and Padula.  New data is being compiled for the residents of these towns who immigrated abroad.

We have used the charts of decent for the Serrapede, Muro, Scotti and Coppola families of Agropoli to prepare this posting.

A Name from the Past comes back into the Present

Uncle Sammy Serrapede had one of those “AHA” moments while we reviewed the marriages made by the children of Francesco and Rosolia (nee Patella) Scotti.

The mention of the marriage of their daughter Carmela brought back memories he had of a family who frequently called and visited his parents while he was growing up.

What brought about the “AHA” moment:  Carmela Scotti and Ignazio Coppola

Carmela was born circa 1850 to Francesco and Rosolia (nee Patella) Scotti in Agropoli.

 On February 20, 1869 Carmela married Ignazio Coppola.

Their children were:  Fortunata b.1871, Maddalena b.1873, Evangelista b.1875, Filomena b.1877, Antonia b.1881, Carmine b.1884, Emilia b.1886, Rosalia b.1892

Carmela Scotti Coppola was the sister of Sammy’s Great Grandfather Carmine Scotti.  Carmela was Sammy’s Great Aunt.

Aha!  The Coppolas were our paesanos!

A paesano (masculine) or paesana (feminine)is a person from one’s home town in Italy.

When discussing Carmela Scotti’s marriage with my Uncle Sammy on March 8, 2015 he mentioned that the Coppola family were very close paesanos to his parents.  He remembers that the Coppola family members his mom Josie knew lived in Brooklyn, NY.  There were also family members in Burlington, NJ and Wilmerding, PA.  Whenever the Coppola family of Burlington, NJ came to Brooklyn to visit their extended family they would stop by to visit the Serrapedes.

My Uncle Sammy said his father Sam also had paesanos from the Coppola family.  He wanted to know if the relationship went any further.

On Saturday, March 14, 2015 we reviewed the genealogical tables created by Anthony Vermandois and the pedigree charts on our family tree at Ancestry we made a discovery that explains why there were frequent visits by the Coppola family as he was growing up:  in addition to sharing the same hometown, there were ties of blood and marriage that brought the families together.

Continue reading

19b-Scotti Family in Agropoli-Francesco and Rosolia’s Children Get Married

Acknowledgement

The research done by Anthony Vermandois at Imagines Maiorum-Ancestors from Campania forms the basis for this exploration into the lives of our family who lived in Agropoli before immigrating to the United States. We have used the charts of descent for the Scotti family to prepare this posting.

Relationship Notes

Francesco and Rosolia (nee Patella) Scotti were:

–Sammy’s 2nd Great Grandparents
–EmilyAnn’s 3rd Great Grandparents

Children of Francesco and Rosolia Scotti

Francesco and Rosolia had four children who lived to marry and have children of their own. They are:

Raffaele Scotti
Born: c.1835
Married: Filomena Gallo di Mauro
Children: Rosalia b.1867, Francesco b.1868, Carmine b.1870, Antonio b.1872, Carmela b.1874, Rosa b.1876, Carlo b.1879, Gabriele b.1882
Died: 26.03.1906
Occupation: Marinaro (fisherman)

CARMINE SCOTTI (our direct line ancestor)
Born: c.1846
Married: Maria Giovanna di Giaimo 27.05.1869, Agropoli
Children: Raffaele b.1870, Raffaele b.1871, Evangelista b.1873, Antonio b.1875, Fedele b.1878, Mariano b.1880, Antonio b.1885, Concetta/LETIZIA b.1888, Elisa b.1891
Occupation: Marinaro (fisherman)

Carmela Scotti
Born: c.1850
Married: Ignazio Coppola 20.02.1869, Agropoli
Children: Fortunata b.1871, Maddalena b.1873, Evangelista b.1875, Filomena b.1877, Antonia b.1881, Carmine b.1884, Emilia b.1886, Rosalia b.1892

Antonia Scotti
Born: c.1853
Married: Matteo Giordano 22.05.1875, Agropoli
Children: Saverio b.1878, Vincenzo b.1881, Anna b.1884, Rosa b.1887, Emilia b.1891, Raffaele b.1894, Carmine b.1896

Continue reading

19a-Scotti Family in Agropoli-A Change in Fortunes-The Children of Francesco and Rosolia

Acknowledgement

The research done by Anthony Vermandois at Imagines Maiorum-Ancestors from Campania forms the basis for this exploration into the lives of our family who lived in Agropoli before immigrating to the United States.

Relationship Notes

Francesco and Rosolia Scotti  were:

–Sammy’s 2nd Great Grandparents
–EmilyAnn’s  3rd Great Grandparents.

Children of Francesco and Rosolia

Francesco (1807-1887) was the second son of Aniello and Anna Maria (nee Baldi) Scotti.  Like his father and older brother his profession was described as a Possidente.  This means he either had land holdings or was a landlord.

We cannot determine the date when Francesco Scotti married Rosolia Patella.  No information about Rosolia or the marriage is available right now at Imagines Maiorum.  Their children were:

Raffaele Scotti
Born: c.1835

CARMINE SCOTTI (our direct line ancestor)
Born: c.1846

Carmela Scotti
Born: c.1850

Antonia Scotti
Born: c.1853

Continue reading

18-Scotti Family in Agropoli-A Change in Fortunes-The Children of Giuseppe and Antonia

Acknowledgement

Genealogist Anthony Vermandois has conducted extensive research into the families of several towns in Campania, Italy. At his site, Imagines Maiorum, are compiled the dates of birth, death, marriage and immigration for these families. The data is organized into charts of descent for each branch of a family. We have used the charts for the Scotti family of Agropoli to prepare this week’s posting.

Introduction

The earliest ancestors we know of in our direct Scotti bloodline were Aniello and Anna Maria (nee Baldi) Scotti. Aniello was a landowner (possidente). His sons Giuseppe and Francesco inherited that title from their father. Aniello’s descendants saw a change of fortunes as Italy went through unification and periods of disease and natural disasters. By the late 19th century his descendants were no longer landowners.

Before studying the changes to our own direct line ancestors, we reviewed the continuation of the landholdings in the family of Giuseppe and Antonia Scotti. Their descendants fared much better than those of Francesco, our direct line ancestor. Even when Giuseppe’s family no longer were landowners the professions that his grandsons engaged in were of a higher professional and social status than those of Francesco’s sons and grandsons.

Relationship Notes

Family Chart for Giuseppe and Antonia (nee Cuoco) Scotti.

Giuseppe and Antonia Scotti were:

—Sammy’s Second Great Aunt and Uncle
—EmilyAnn’s Third Great Aunt and Uncle

Giuseppe and Antonia’s son Fillipo was:

—Sammy’s First Cousin 3 times removed
—EmilyAnn’s First Cousin 4 times removed

Continue reading