50-Serrapede Family in America: Josie and Sam get married, 1930

Introduction

Around 1928, Josie Muro had to leave her hometown of Wilmerding, Pennsylvania to avoid the damage gossip would cause to her reputation and the honor of her family.  A young man named Ernest, who was already engaged to another woman, started a flirtation which Josie was reluctant to stop.  Josie’s parents met with the parents of the woman Ernest was engaged to.  All parties agreed the most expedient thing to do was send Josie to live with relatives in Dyker Heights, Brooklyn.  Ernest would not know where she went and the matter would be settled.  Josie came to Dyker Heights in Brooklyn where she lived with her maternal Aunt Elisa Scotti Errico and family.

Three years earlier in August of 1925 Sam Serrapede came to America from Agropoli.  Until 1930 he lived with his sister and brother-in-law in Red Hook, Brooklyn.  Given the distance between Red Hook and Dyker Heights we will try to use the Marriage Certificate to recreate a possible scenario as to how Josie and Sam got together.  Even though Josie and Sam shared many memories and family stories throughout the years, they never reminisced about how they met, their courtship or their wedding day.

Relationship Notes

Sam (Sabato) Serrapede was the son of Gennaro and Emilia (nee Papplardo) Serrapede.

Josie Muro was the daughter of Nick (Nicola) and Letizia (nee Scotti) Muro.

Josie and Sam were:

• Sammy’s Parents.
• EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandparents.

The Marriage Certificate of Sabato Serrapede and Josephine Muro

50-josie20and20sam20marriage20certificate_zpsyn9eiqj9
Marriage Certificate of Josie and Sam.

Obtaining Josie and Sam’s marriage certificate helped answer the questions we had concerning their whereabouts prior to marriage.  Sam gave his address as 2472 West Street in Brooklyn.  This is the same address where his sister Filomena and her family were living when the 1930 Census was taken.

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49a-Father’s Day, June 18, 2017

49a-Father's Day 2017 Freedom from Fear Norman Rockwell

“Freedom from Fear” by Norman Rockwell (1943)
Public Domain.  NARA Archives, Washington, D.C . via Wikimedia Commons (see Resources for link)

This coming Sunday, June 18th, 2017 is Father’s Day in the U.S.  We remember the patriarchs of our family lines, the fathers of our ancestors and the fathers of our ancestresses.  We thank you for the strength, dedication, hard work, commitment and love you gave your families.

 “Silent Strong Dad”
by Karen K. Boyer

He never looks for praises
He’s never one to boast
He just goes on quietly working
For those he loves the most
His dreams are seldom spoken
His wants are very few
And most of the time his worries
Will go unspoken too
He’s there…. A firm foundation
Through all our storms of life
A sturdy hand to hold to
In times of stress and strife
A true friend we can turn to
When times are good or bad
One of our greatest blessings,
The man that we call Dad.

The Fathers of Our Family Lines

Serrapede Family

Luigi Serrapede
Sabato Serrapede
Gennaro Serrapede
Vincenzo Ruocco
Antonio Pappalardo
Nicola Pappalardo
Alessandro Patella
Sabato Serrapede

Muro Family

Nunziante di Muro
Pietro di Muro
Gaetano Ruocco
Nicola Ruocco
Luigi Serrapede
Aniello Scotti
Francesco Scotti
Carmine Scotti
Giuseppe di Giaimo
Francesco di Giamo
Nicola Muro

Aiello Family

Angelo Aiello
Alessandro Bartolotta
Vincenzo Aiello
Angelo Aiello
Eugenio Pujia

Remembering you with love,

–Sabbatino Serrapede, Jr.
–EmilyAnn Frances May


 

Resources

“Freedom from Fear” by Norman Rockwell, 1943
Wikimedia Commons
Public Domain
National Archives and Records Administration Identifer 513538
Record group: Record Group 44: Records of the Office of Government Reports, 1932 – 1947 (National Archives Identifier: 373 )
Series: World War II Posters, compiled 1942 – 1945 (National Archives Identifier: 513498 )
NAIL Control Number: NWDNS-44-PA-77
44-PA-77
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:The_Four_Freedoms_by_Norman_Rockwell

familyfriend poems
“Silent Strong Dad”
© Karen K. Boyer
Published: February 2006
https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/silent-strong-dad

Further reading

Norman Rockwell
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Rockwell

 

 

 

 

 

47a-Mother’s Day 2017

maternal admiration)

“Maternal Admiration” by William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Public domain.  Wikimedia Commons.

We remember

The Serrapede Family
Angela Maria Borrelli
Anna Maria Conte
Filomena Ruocco
Antonia Ruocco
Nicoletta Cuoco
Teresa Marino
Giovanna Battista
Teresa Patella d’Alessandro
Emilia Pappalardo
Emily Leatrice Serrapede

We remember…

The Muro Family
Anna Maria Monzillo
Carminela Cavollo
Giuseppa Carnicelli
Clarice Serrapede
Giuseppa Ruocco
Anna Maria Baldi
Rosolia Patella
Maddalena Montone
Irene Guzzi
Maria Giovanna di Giaimo
Letizia Scotti
Josephine Muro

We remember…

The Aiello Family
Antonia Rocca
Caterina Mastroianni
Lucrezia M.F. Bartolotta
Caterina Pujia
Rosina Aiello

We remember with gratitude all our matriarchs in our family lines this Mother’s Day on May 14, 2017.
In memory of the Mothers of our family lines who were with us from our beginnings.  You not only fed and nurtured our bodies but also saw to the development of our spiritual, emotional and intellectual growth.  With your love we progressed and with your blessings we achieved.  With your advice we were guided and with your caution we were protected.  There are never enough words to express the gratitude we have so we’ll say it simply, “To all the Mamas in our family past, present and future–Thank you, thank you.  We will always love you.”

–EmilyAnn Frances May
–Sam (Sabbatino) Serrapede, Jr.

—————

Acknowledgement
Painting:  “Maternal Admiration” (1869)
Artisit:  William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Public Domain
Wikimedia Commons

47-Giuseppe D’Agosto in New York-A young man with a job and a passport

Acknowledgement

The chart of descent for the D’Agosto family, available at ImaginesMaiorum, Ancetors from Campania, was used to provide information about the date of Giuseppe D’Agosto’s marriage. We thank Anthony Vermandois for making the results of his genealogical research available at his website.

Introduction

47-giuseppe20dagosto20in20new20york-192320passport20photo20close-up_zps6i3sivbo

Close-up of Giuseppe D’Agosto’s photo affixed to the application for a passport in 1923.

Giuseppe D’Agosto is related to Uncle Sammy and me by marriage. He was the husband of Filomena Serrapede D’Agosto. Filomena was the elder sister of Sabato Serrapede who was Sammy’s Dad and EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandfather. This makes Giuseppe and Filomena D’Agosto:

  • Uncle Sammy’s paternal Uncle and Aunt.
  • EmilyAnn’s Great Uncle and Aunt along her maternal line.

In this posting we share the discovery the 1920 Federal Census brought us once we learned who Giuseppe was working for. Of all the relatives we’ve studied so far he is the first we know of who became a civil service employee. He achieved much and went far in the 7 years after he came to the United States in 1913.

What was the DSC?

47-192020fed20census20with20giuseppe20dagosto_zpsxaiutafk

Close-up of 1920 Federal Census entry for the Gibaldi family.

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46c-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families in America: Family and Work, Part 3

Acknowledgement

Genealogist Anthony Vermandois has researched families of the Campania region in Italy. We have used the charts of descent for several families in Agropoli who appear in Parts 1-3 of the posting 46c-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families in America: Family and Work. To view the source information for these families, please click on a surname below. A new browser window will open and navigate to the page for that family.

Carnicelli

D’Agosto

Romaniello

Introduction

Uncle Sammy grew up on 65th Street between 12th and 13th Avenues during the 1940s and 1950s. As we reviewed records for his Uncle Giuseppe D’Agosto we discovered a connection to members of the Carnicelli family who immigrated to America and settled in Dyker Heights and lived on 65th Street. Uncle Sammy asked me to find out if the Julia Carnicelli he remembers from his childhood was related to Giuseppe D’Agosto.

At last, we find Julia

The search for Julia Carnicelli first led us to learn about her brother-in-law Joseph Carnicelli who was featured in Part 1 and Part 2 of this series.

At ImaginesMaiorum, we found Julia entered as Giulia Romaniello, wife of Antonio Carnicelli. Antonio was Joseph’s younger brother. After his arrival in America he was known as Anthony. Anthony was born in Agropoli on January 22 1907. He immigrated to the United States in 1930 and became a citizen after that.

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46c-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families in America: Family and Work, Part 1

Acknowledgement

We acknowledge and thank genealogist Anthony Vermandois for the work he has done researching the families of Agropoli and other towns in Campania, Italy. The information he has gathered is presented through charts of descent at Imagines Maiorum. To access the particular charts for the families featured in posting 46c parts 1-3, click on the surnames that follow. A new screen will open and navigate to the page for that surname at Anthony’s site.

Carnicelli

D’Agosto

Romaniello

Margiotta

Comunale

Taddeo

Relationship Notes

Filomena Serrapede was the eldest sister of Sabato Serrapede who was Sammy’s father and EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandfather. She married Giuseppe D’Agosto in 1923.

This made Filomena and Giuseppe D’Agosto:

–Sammy’s paternal Aunt and Uncle
–EmilyAnn’s Great Aunt and Uncle along her maternal line.

Introduction

During our initial research about Giuseppe D’Agosto, we learned that his mother was Raffaela Carnicelli. Uncle Sammy mentioned that as he was growing up the Carnicelli family who lived on 65th Street were paesanos of our family. Since many first generation families from Agropoli settled close to each other in Brooklyn, he wondered if they were our relatives. In particular, Uncle Sammy remembered a Julia Carnicelli who he thought lived in a multi-family dwelling where the other Carnicelli paesanos lived.

This set me on a search for Julia that was almost like following a fairy as she flew here and there leading me through the garden as I gathered flowers. Only I was actually gathering data that came together to tell a story not only about Julia, but her husband, brother-in-law and Giuseppe D’Agosto. The story is in the details and there are many. To avoid overwhelming the reader we have broken the posting into three parts. Part 1 will focus on Giuseppe D’Agosto and how he was related to Joseph and Anthony Carnicelli. We will also learn about Giuseppe’s life after his marriage in 1923 to Filomena Serrapede.

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45-Muro Family in America: Josie comes to Brooklyn, 1929

45-josie201929_zpsh20mcpow

Josie Muro in 1929.

Introduction

Josie Muro was the daughter of Nicola and Letizia (nee Scotti) Muro. She was born in 1909 in Agropoli and came to the United States with her mother in 1912. Her father came a few years earlier in order to secure work and a place to live. The family settled in Wilmerding, Pennsylvania.

Josie came up to Brooklyn, NY sometime between 1928 and 1929. My Mom told me of the events leading up to it in a general way but without too many details. As a child, Uncle Sammy learned of a similar version of the story.

The information obtained from our reviews of the 1920 Federal Census in Wilmerding and the 1925 New York State Census entries for Brooklyn, NY helped fill in the spaces that existed in our knowledge regarding the story of Josie’s coming to Brooklyn. We shared what we knew. Then using the factual evidence from the Census records created a time line that provides us with a framework to better understand events that were in place before, during and after Josie’s move to Brooklyn.

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