46c-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families in America: Family and Work, Part 1

Acknowledgement

We acknowledge and thank genealogist Anthony Vermandois for the work he has done researching the families of Agropoli and other towns in Campania, Italy. The information he has gathered is presented through charts of descent at Imagines Maiorum. To access the particular charts for the families featured in posting 46c parts 1-3, click on the surnames that follow. A new screen will open and navigate to the page for that surname at Anthony’s site.

Carnicelli

D’Agosto

Romaniello

Margiotta

Comunale

Taddeo

Relationship Notes

Filomena Serrapede was the eldest sister of Sabato Serrapede who was Sammy’s father and EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandfather. She married Giuseppe D’Agosto in 1923.

This made Filomena and Giuseppe D’Agosto:

–Sammy’s paternal Aunt and Uncle
–EmilyAnn’s Great Aunt and Uncle along her maternal line.

Introduction

During our initial research about Giuseppe D’Agosto, we learned that his mother was Raffaela Carnicelli. Uncle Sammy mentioned that as he was growing up the Carnicelli family who lived on 65th Street were paesanos of our family. Since many first generation families from Agropoli settled close to each other in Brooklyn, he wondered if they were our relatives. In particular, Uncle Sammy remembered a Julia Carnicelli who he thought lived in a multi-family dwelling where the other Carnicelli paesanos lived.

This set me on a search for Julia that was almost like following a fairy as she flew here and there leading me through the garden as I gathered flowers. Only I was actually gathering data that came together to tell a story not only about Julia, but her husband, brother-in-law and Giuseppe D’Agosto. The story is in the details and there are many. To avoid overwhelming the reader we have broken the posting into three parts. Part 1 will focus on Giuseppe D’Agosto and how he was related to Joseph and Anthony Carnicelli. We will also learn about Giuseppe’s life after his marriage in 1923 to Filomena Serrapede.

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46b-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families-Agropoli and Brooklyn

Acknowledgement

The genealogical research by Anthony Vermandois of ImaginesMaiorum-Ancestors from Campania forms the basis of this posting. We have used Anthony’s charts of descent for the following families:

Charts for D’Agosto Family Lines

Carnicelli Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=582

Taddeo Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=134

d’Agosto Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=668

Introduction

This posting serves as a bridge between our introduction of Giuseppe D’Agosto in 46a-D’Agosto Family – Giuseppe comes to America and the three part series that follows this current posting. There are two Giuseppes in this narrative as well as what appeared to be a tenuous relationship between our families through the D’Agosto matriarch, Rafaella Carnicelli D’Agosto, and our matriarch, Giuseppa Carnicelli Ruocco (part of the Muro line).

Uncle Sammy and I are glad we paused to look through all these factors because the findings enabled us to be more accurate in our three part series. It also helped us understand how easily one can mistake a paeasano (friend from the old hometown) for a cugina or cugino (cousin). We also resorted to the expedient device of calling one of the Giuseppes by his American name of Joseph since that is what he used most often for the Census interviews.  You will meet Joseph Carnicelli in the next posting.

If any confusion remains after you read this posting, please put your questions into the Comment section and we’ll add more information. Continue reading

46a-D’Agosto Family – Giuseppe comes to America

Acknowledgement

The research of genealogist Anthony Vermandois provides the basis for this week’s posting. At his website, ImaginesMaiorum-Ancestors from Campania, data from vital records is presented for inhabitants of Agropoli and other towns from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries. We have used his charts of descent for the d’Agosto family of Agropoli to present the family background of Giuseppe D’Agosto.

Giuseppe’s surname is spelled as d’Agosto at Anthony’s website.   The vital records we have obtained through Ancestry display variations. After Giuseppe came to America we see his surname spelled as D’Agosto, Dagosto or D’agosto. We are using the spelling of D’Agosto since this is the one we have seen written on the back of the photos we have and also a postcard from Giuseppe’s daughter Emilia.

The charts of descent for the D’Agosto family of Agropoli can be viewed at Imagines Maiorum.

Relationship Notes

Giuseppe D’Agosto is related to Uncle Sammy and I by his marriage to Filomena Serrapede.

-Filomena Serrapede was:
–the eldest sister of Sammy’s Dad, Sam Serrapede.
–Sammy’s Paternal Aunt
–Emily Ann’s Great-Aunt (along her maternal line)

Introduction

In Posting 45-Muro Family in America: Josie comes to Brooklyn we traced the series of events which forced Josie Muro to leave her hometown of Wilmerding and come to Brooklyn sometime in late 1928 or early 1929.

Josie was introduced to her future husband Sam Serrapede after she came to Brooklyn. According to the records we have so far, Sam was living with his sister Filomena and her husband Giuseppe D’Agosto after he arrived in the United States. The relationship between Sam and his sister Filomena remained loving and strong from childhood onwards. Uncle Sammy and my late Mom grew up enjoying the company of their D‘Agosto cousins, Aunt and Uncle. The narrative of Filomena and Giuseppe’s lives and their coming to America is an important part of the relationships detailed in subsequent postings. We will, therefore, focus on Giuseppe D’Agosto’s early years in America. Like many young patriarchs of the immediate and extended family in the first generation, he emigrated from Italy when he was single. Giuseppe obtained employment and filed his naturalization papers before returning to Italy where he married Filomena before bringing her to America.

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11g-Back in New York City-Did Cousin Sabato Serrapede become businessman Sabato Sarrapere? (part 2)

We continue our investigation into what happened to our Cousin Sabato Serrapede after he came to New York.  For the background please see part 1 of this posting.  With the discovery of the naturalization papers of a Mr. Sabato Sarrapere we have to consider if these are two different people or if Cousin Sabato changed his surname after coming to New York…

Sabato Sarrapere:  The story contained in his Naturalization papers

Complete Petition for Naturalization for Sabato Sarrapere.

Close-up of the top of Sabato’s Petition for Naturalization.

Close-up of the Petition for Naturalization with the story of the fraudulent certificate.

The Petition gives an estimated Date of Birth for Sabato of September 27, 1868.  He was born in Agropoli and came to the United States on the SS Brittania on September 27, 1888.  Although this date differs from the Britannia Passenger List our search turned up we think it is a mistake on the Petition.  Sabato’s date of birth is also entered as on or about September 27, 1868 which differs slightly from the date of September 16, 1868 which appears at ImaginesMaiorum.

The story of the fraudulent Certificate of Naturalization states that:

“This petitioner was in possession of a fraudulent certificate of naturalization purporting to have been issued by the United States District Court, Eastern District of New York, October 27, 1893.  Said paper was surrendered and duly cancelled October 27, 1903, and this petitioner is permitted to reapply for naturalization by an order signed and entered, on notice to the United States District Attorney, in the office of the Clerk of the District Court of the United States, Southern District of New York, March 1, 1907.”

I held hope at this point that there might still be more factual data available to find a link between Cousin Sabato Serrapede and Sabato Sarrapere.

Overview of Sabato Sarrapere’s life

According to the Petition for Naturalization, in 1907 Sabato Sarrpere was living at 43 Mott Street with his wife Arcangela (nee Aloise) Sarrapere.  Their children were:

Rosina, Sept. 30, 1898
Carmela, Aug. 9, 1900
Gennaro, Nov. 29, 1902
Ronato, May 7, 1904
Giuseppe, Sept. 13, 1906

All the children were born in New York City.

1905 NYS Census.

Two years earlier, the NYS Census enumerator visited the Sarrapere family.  Again the name is misspelled, this time as Sarrapieda.  The family had a boarder named Antonio Corrento living with them.  Sabato’s profession is described as laborer.

Our next breakthrough came with the discovery of Mr. Sarrapere’s real estate transactions.

Note:  Uncle Sammy said that the Correnti family of 1166-65th Street were friends with the first generation of the Serrapede family.  The name Corrento, however, is not familiar to us.

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11g-Back in New York City-Did Cousin Sabato Serrapede become businessman Sabato Sarrapere? (part 1)

Acknowledgement

We have used the database at ImaginesMaiorum to investigate the lineage of the Serrapede family.  Genealogist Anthony Vermandois created this database and website to present the data on families he has researched who lived in the Campania region between the late 1790s to early 20th century..

The Search for Cousin Sabato Serrapede

Sabato Serrapede,, son of  Gennaro and Rosa (nee Scotti) Serrapede, is one of those elusive relatives who appear and disappear as searches take place for other relatives in our family line.

The discovery of Sabato’s trip to New York City in 1897 revealed that he was already a U.S. Citizen, as noted on the ship’s passenger list.  This makes him the earliest Serrapede within our extended line that was in the United States.  He also appears as the host of two other relatives within our line.  Then after 1909 he disappears without a trace.

The database at ImaginesMaiorum, where Anthony Vermandois has compiled the vital statistics of families from Campania, does not have a date of death for Cousin Sabato.  Recent searches have brought back many documents gathered over several sessions at Ancestry.  At first it seemed as if we were back on the trail to finding Cousin Sabato.

Here’s what happened….

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9-Serrapede Family in America: Birds of Passage, Late 19th-Early 20th Centuries

  • Many of the Birds of Passage were from Eastern and Southern Europe.
  • Some online sources say the birds of passage came here alone.  In the case of our Serrapede, Muro and extended family from Agropoli there was a network beginning to establish itself.
  • From the research so far we know that in addition to the Scotti, Serrapede and Muro families, we also have the Mattarazzo, Di Luccio and Cuoco families coming here. We still need further research to distinguish who came to stay and who came just to work for a certain period of time.
  • The goal was to save as much money as possible and bring it back to the home country.
    • The goal of Italian  Birds of Passage was to accumulate enough money in the U.S. that would enable them to realize an improvement to their life in Italy.  For example, an improvement in the quality of their life would be the purchase of a home or a plot of land.

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8-Serrapede Family in Agropoli: Gennaro and Emilia

Acknowledgements

Anthony Vermandois has conducted extensive research into the families of Agropoli in Campania province of Italy.  The data includes vital statistics for families beginning in the late 18th century.  Our Serrapede ancestors are featured on this page at Anthony’s website Imagines Maiorum-Ancestors From Campania.

We are very thankful for the resources Anthony’s research has led us to.  His findings help us understand the backstory of our ancestor’s lives before they immigrated to America.

Relationship Notes

As we begin our study of the life of Gennaro Serrapede an element enters our journey that is hard to explain.  It’s a sense of closeness despite the distance in time.  For here we now meet one of our own family who made the long trip from Agropoli to the United States.

Neither Uncle Sammy nor I knew that Gennaro came several times to work in the U.S.  We also had no knowledge of the extended network he had in the U.S. that enabled him to travel to many cities as he sought employment.  We are deeply impressed with the help extended to Gennaro and thankful for the spirit of mutual assistance that comes across so strongly as we study the documentation used to create these postings.

Gennaro Serrapede was:

Sammy’s Grandfather
EmilyAnn’s Great-Grandfather

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