50a-Serrapede Family in America: Family and Match Making

Introduction

After the posting of 50-Serrapede Family in America: Josie and Sam get married, 1930 I heard from Cousin Michael Muro. He sends his regards to Uncle Sammy and our readers. Michael has spent the last three months hosting Giuseppe Carnicelli of Agropoli during his stay in the United States. Michael has travelled with Giuseppe from Pittsburgh to New York, Florida and other locations. Giuseppe has also been studying English conversation and reading during this time. Michael and Giuseppe will return to Italy after the July 4th holiday.

Michael shared with me additional information about his own family’s connections with Josie and Sam. Based on these relationships Michael offers up some scenarios that expand the possible ways in which Josie and Sam were brought together.

Relationship Notes

50a-michaels20pedigree20chart_zps4cza8w2vPedigree Chart for Michael Muro with maternal and paternal lines.

50a-emilyanns20pedigree20chart_zpsvqpheu0pPedigree chart for EmilyAnn Frances May showing her maternal line only.

Michael and I share Nicola “Nick” Muro as our common ancestor.

Nick Muro was:

–Michael’s Grandfather along his paternal line.
–EmilyAnn’s Great Grandfather along her maternal line.

Michael’s maternal Grandparents were:

–Raffaele (Ralph) and Pasqualina (nee Camperlingo) Di Fiore

Michael’s paternal Grandparents were:

–Nicola “Nick” and Rose (nee Rosina Aiello Marasco) Muro 

Michael’s parents were:

–Raymond (Raimie) and Frances (nee Di Fiore) Muro

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49-Serrapede Family in America: The Little Church in Dyker Heights, 1930

Introduction

Filomena Serrapede D’Agosto was the eldest sister of Sam Serrapede.  She was the first member of Sam’s family to come to America.  Filomena married Giuseppe D’Agosto in 1923.  Giuseppe secured employment as a truck driver for the New York City Department of Sanitation.  The D’Agosto family lived in Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY.

In 1925 Sam came to America with the intention of making a new life for himself.  He aimed at getting himself established through securing employment and beginning the process towards citizenship.  Giuseppe and Filomena provided him with a place to live during his first five years in America.

Relationship Notes

• Sam (Sabato) Serrapede was:
• The son of Gennaro and Emilia (nee Pappalardo) Serrapede of Agropoli, Salerno, Campania Province in Italy.
• Sammy’s father.
• EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandfather.

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46b-D’Agosto and Carnicelli Families-Agropoli and Brooklyn

Acknowledgement

The genealogical research by Anthony Vermandois of ImaginesMaiorum-Ancestors from Campania forms the basis of this posting. We have used Anthony’s charts of descent for the following families:

Charts for D’Agosto Family Lines

Carnicelli Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=582

Taddeo Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=134

d’Agosto Family http://www.imaginesmaiorum.net/surname.cfm?id=668

Introduction

This posting serves as a bridge between our introduction of Giuseppe D’Agosto in 46a-D’Agosto Family – Giuseppe comes to America and the three part series that follows this current posting. There are two Giuseppes in this narrative as well as what appeared to be a tenuous relationship between our families through the D’Agosto matriarch, Rafaella Carnicelli D’Agosto, and our matriarch, Giuseppa Carnicelli Ruocco (part of the Muro line).

Uncle Sammy and I are glad we paused to look through all these factors because the findings enabled us to be more accurate in our three part series. It also helped us understand how easily one can mistake a paeasano (friend from the old hometown) for a cugina or cugino (cousin). We also resorted to the expedient device of calling one of the Giuseppes by his American name of Joseph since that is what he used most often for the Census interviews.  You will meet Joseph Carnicelli in the next posting.

If any confusion remains after you read this posting, please put your questions into the Comment section and we’ll add more information. Continue reading

44-The Errico Family: From Wilmerding to Brooklyn, 1920-1925

Acknowledgement

We have used the charts of descent for the Scotti family available at ImaginesMairoum, the site presenting the genealogical data compiled by Anthony Vermandois. This data has been collected from Agropoli and other towns in Campania province, Salerno.

For the other documentation used please see the Resources section at the end of this posting.

Introduction

In our last posting we introduced Josie Muro. She was the eldest child in a family grew in size to 11 children by the early 1930s. Variations of a family story recounting why Josie left Wilmerding, Pennsylvania at the age of 18 or 19 to come to Brooklyn, New York provided a bare minimum of details. By using the census records and ships passenger lists for other relatives we are gaining insights into what happened to facilitate Josie’s move up to Brooklyn.

We will turn our attention to the contacts the Muro family had in Brooklyn who, we are certain, helped Josie in the very quick move her parents had her make from Wilmerding to Brooklyn. The story gets more interesting as the details fall into place.

Josie’s Zia Elisa

Josie’s mother, Letizia passed away in 1921 when Josie was 12 years old. We think Letizia was a weakened by an accident in the previous year plus the frequency of her pregnancies. Nick Muro, Josie’s father, married Rose (Rosina) Aiello Marasco in late 1921 – early 1922. We know from Josie’s own discussions with us that she had many chores and errands to perform each day to help Rose with the household.

Letizia’s two sisters, Concetta and Elisa, also lived nearby in Wilmerding. The Scotti family remained close to Letizia’s children during the lifetimes of the first generation of our family in America. Josie enjoyed long phone calls with Elisa. I remember during the times we visited, that even if she were cooking in the kitchen, she’d take time out to sit down and listen to what her Aunt was calling about.

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41b-A Christmas Greeting to Our Relatives and Paesani

ourfamilychristmasblog_zpshi5vid3g

 

Rejoice!
For our family,
For our friends.
Those who are near,
Those who are far.
May Our Lord watch over you, guide you, provide for you and bless you always.
Merry Christmas!
And a prosperous New Year.

********

Rallegrarsi!
Per la nostra famiglia,
Per i nostri amici.
Coloro che sono vicino,
Coloro che sono lontani,
Possa il Signore vegli su di voi, vi guiderà, fornire per voi e vi benedica sempre.
Buon Natale!
E un prospero Anno Nuovo.

–Sam Serrapede
–EmilyAnn Frances May

 

 


 

 

 

 

Image: University of Dayton via Pinterest
https://uk.pinterest.com/patricialoose/natal/