49-Serrapede Family in America: The Little Church in Dyker Heights, 1930

Introduction

Filomena Serrapede D’Agosto was the eldest sister of Sam Serrapede.  She was the first member of Sam’s family to come to America.  Filomena married Giuseppe D’Agosto in 1923.  Giuseppe secured employment as a truck driver for the New York City Department of Sanitation.  The D’Agosto family lived in Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY.

In 1925 Sam came to America with the intention of making a new life for himself.  He aimed at getting himself established through securing employment and beginning the process towards citizenship.  Giuseppe and Filomena provided him with a place to live during his first five years in America.

Relationship Notes

• Sam (Sabato) Serrapede was:
• The son of Gennaro and Emilia (nee Pappalardo) Serrapede of Agropoli, Salerno, Campania Province in Italy.
• Sammy’s father.
• EmilyAnn’s maternal Grandfather.

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38b-Muro Family in America: The Accident, 1920

Relationship Notes

In this posting we consider the stories we have learned about the death of Ernest Muro, son of Nick and Letizia Muro. Ernest was 1 year old when he died. The official record of his death is in direct opposition to the cause we learned about during research and family discussions. To help you understand the relationships discussed in this posting we have outlined them in this section.

Ernest Muro was the son of Nicola and Letizia (nee Scotti) Muro. Ernest’s siblings were:

  • Josie
  • Peter
  • Louis
  • Philomena
  • Rosie

Ernest is related to EmilyAnn and Sammy. Ernest was:

  • Sammy’s Uncle (through Josie, Sammy’s Mom).
  • EmilyAnn’s Great Uncle (through Josie’s daughter Emily Leatrice).

Ernest’s sister Josie was:

  • Sammy’s Mom.
  • EmilyAnn’s Maternal Grandmother. 

Introduction 

In our previous posting we reviewed the safety issues that surrounded the use of horses in an urban environment in the late 19th-early 20th centuries. We also considered the manner in which pedestrians utilized the pavements and streets. The automobile eventually eclipsed the use of horses by the 1920s. Pedestrians were made aware, through public safety campaigns, that the street was for vehicles and the sidewalk was for people.

George Westinghouse ensured that Wilmerding had a mass transit system within the town when it was first built. Yet even as the 1920s began, there were small companies within Wilmerding that still used a horse drawn cart as a means of transport. As we researched the children of Letizia and Nick Muro we learned about their next to youngest child, Ernest. The family never spoke about him and we were ready to accept the story which official documentation gave about his death. That was until we interacted with other relatives at Ancestry and compared family stories we heard. This is how we learned that Ernest’s death may have been hastened due to an accident caused by a horse drawn cart.  Continue reading

7e-Agropoli, July 1976: First Holy Communion Procession

We had finished a leisurely afternoon meal at the apartment of Italia the Elder, my Grandpa Sam’s sister and mother of his niece Italia the Younger.  Everyone was very excited and had prepared a bowl of yellow flower petals for us to shower upon a procession that was about to take place outside.

The streets were decorated with pictures of the Chalice and Name of Jesus (Gesu) all made out of the same yellow flower petals.

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